Delivering Sanctuary Scholarships

Offering scholarships to people seeking sanctuary is one of the main ways that a university can embed its commitment to being a University of Sanctuary. In 2018, Article 26 became incorporated into the University of Sanctuary network and we are able to benefit from the excellent resources and networks they created over 10 years. We are also partnering with STAR (Student Action for Refugees) and others and are active members of the Access to Higher Education Working Group. 

This page contains the Article 26 resources which have been designed to help universities create and implement the best possible Sanctuary Scholarship schemes. 

For currently available access courses and Higher Education Scholarships visit the STAR website. Please contact STAR if your university has access courses or scholarships that they are not currently listed.

If you would like to discuss how we might be able to offer or facilitate more specific support for sanctuary scholarship schemes please e-mail [email protected].

Article 26 resources

Guiding Principles for Sanctuary Scholars

A set of guiding principles for Higher Educations Institutions when designing and delivering Sanctuary Scholarship schemes

Identifying Sanctuary Scholars

A guide to identifying the different groups collectively described as forced migrants and whom we would encourage universities to include in their eligibility criteria for scholarship schemes

Reaching out to Sanctuary Scholars

This resource outlines key outreach strategies for the promotion of sanctuary scholarships internally within universities, in the locality and via national platforms

Sanctuary Scholarship Application Form

A revised and updated application form and accompanying guidance notes to support universities in the establishment of, or review of, their existing scholarship scheme

Selecting Sanctuary Scholars

A selection framework built on and directly connected to the revised application form, which will support universities in the process of shortlisting, interviewing and assessing the specific needs of prospective forced migrant students

More information

A comprehensive guide for universities, published in 2014 aims to assist Higher Education institutions to  fully support a student from an asylum seeking background. Using case studies from the real experiences of Article 26 students,  it contains a whole host of  information about the asylum process, a student’s rights and entitlements whilst they are seeking asylum and a list of organisations where universities can access further information, advice and support.

It’s important to understand how Article 26 developed its eligibility criteria and points to consider when developing criteria for your own bursary scheme. This information can also be found in the appendix of ‘Education for All’.

This report is the result of an investigation commissioned by Article 26 and carried out by Refugee Support Network and Brent Community Law Centre. ‘Establishing a Legal Basis for Artilce 26’ addresses some of the critical legal questions surrounding the work of Article 26 (and the Helena Kennedy Foundation), partner universities and their support of students at different stages in the asylum process. This is essential reading for current and prospective partner universities.

This briefing has been produced by Article 26 and RSN (Refugee Support Network). The document outlines the different rights and entitlements for people with Refugee Status, those with temporary status and asylum seekers awaiting a decision on their application for status, specifically in relation to the feasibility of their studying on an NHS degree programme. The challenges are presented, legal issues are clarified, and tangible solutions are outlined. The briefing concludes with a proposal for potential ‘next steps’ to widen access to NHS degree programmes for prospective students from an asylum-seeking background.

Rebecca Murray, Article 26 Director is currently undertaking an ESRC funded PhD at the University of  Sheffield in collaboration with the Helena Kennedy Foundation. The working title of her thesis is: “Let the right one in” Transcending borders, barriers & binaries; widening access to Higher Education for forced migrants.

Forced migrants seeking sanctuary outside their country of origin, constitute one of the most ‘undesirable’ migrant groups and as such experience marginalisation within society. This doctoral research seeks to explore how this marginalisation is both enacted and resisted at the institutional level, through exploring the barriers faced by forced migrants who seek access to Higher Education. This research questions whether Higher Education replicates the practices and approaches of other institutions in civil society, or if there exists the potential for greater and more powerful resistance to managed migration policies. The UK & Sweden will be the focus of a comparative study within the EU, into the impact of different managed migration regimes on forced migrants’ access to higher education.

For further information and updates on Rebecca’s academic work, see her university profile: https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/geography/phd/pg/rebecca_murray#

The Article 26 2012 evaluation report was commissioned by the Diana, the Princess of Wales Memorial Fund (our funders at the time) and produced by an independent consultant. This evaluation contains detailed information about the purpose and operational practice of the Article 26 and incorporates stakeholder feedback, including from Article 26 students.